Courses

Photo Credit Allison Hopkins Photography

Photo Credit Allison Hopkins Photography

Courses Taught

ENGL 1004, Introduction to Academic Writing, Games of Thrones: An Exploration of Storytelling (Fall 2018): Four-credit introductory course in academic writing. Content included scaffolded hands-on writing skills workshops and analysis of storytelling through literature, graphic novel, video game, and a live escape room game developed specifically for the course. Prerequisite for ENGL 1010/1011 for students identified through standardized test scores (TOEFL, SAT, ACT) or department faculty as needing additional writing practice with individualized support prior to taking the general education required writing courses.

ENGL 1010, Seminar in Academic Writing, The Politics of Writing and Writing about Politics (Spring 2018):Four-credit course in academic writing through interdisciplinary texts. Topics included critical engagement with news, genocide documentary film, writing across disciplines, and multimodal writing.

UNIV 1820, First Year Seminar, UConn Reads: Race in America (Spring 2016): Created in 2014 to introduce freshman and sophomores to life-long learning, independent learning, and active engagement in the academic life of the university through participation in UConn Reads. It was designed to be a collaborative way to practice transferable skills such as critical and creative thinking, grant writing, presentation delivery, and directed academic inquiry. This syllabus focused on the non-fiction book The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander. Topics included the school-to-prison pipeline, racism on the college campus, and unearned privilege.

POLS 2998, Political Issues, Genocide and Narrative Politics (Winter Intersession 2016): Through films, testimonies, news articles, plays, music, and historical accounts, students engaged with a variety of narratives about global genocides. Students applied critical and creative thinking to explore the multitude of voices and silences in these narratives, gaining the transferable skill of critically interpreting narratives of global politics. This interdisciplinary course was grounded in International Relations, but drew upon literary studies, human rights, feminist studies, and a comparative politics approach to inquiry.

HDFS 3080, Supervised Internship Field Experience (Fall 2015, Fall 2016): An upper-level course designed to give advanced students training in the theory of and opportunities to practice leadership, student development, facilitation of difficult discussions, supervision, and active citizenship. To take this course students had to apply and be invited to serve as Teaching Assistants for EPSY 3020 the full duration of the term. Applications included a resume, personal statement, unofficial transcript, and interview.

EPSY 3020, Peer Counseling – FYE Peer Mentoring (Fall 2015, Fall 2016): Students learned basic principles of teaching, student transition, and peer mentorship, applying their learning by serving as junior Teaching Assistants in First Year Experience courses under the supervision of instructors across campus. Assignments focused on hands-on application of course concepts and critical reflection on personal leadership growth. The capstone project was a leadership-focused personal website developed in WordPress. To take this course students had to apply and be invited to serve as First Year Experience 1800/1810/1820 Teaching Assistants for the duration of the term. Applications included a resume, unofficial transcript, and interview.

UNIV 1800-I, University Learning Skills for International Students (Fall 2015, Fall 2016): A component of the First Year Experience (FYE) program, this course was intended to acquaint international students with the university and college-level expectations to support students in their adjustment to the university. The course was tailored to support the holistic student development and transition needs of international students specifically.

UNIV 1820, First Year Seminar, UConn Reads: The Omnivore’s Dilemma (Spring 2015): A one-credit course connected to the Office of the President’s 2014-2015 UConn Reads initiative. Students to analyzed The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan through multiple humanities, social science, and scientific lenses; prepare mock grant applications in groups; and conduct individualized creative academic reflections on the text to be publicly presented and submitted for consideration in the university-wide UConn Reads student competition. Students were also supported to actively contribute to official University programming and blogs.

UNIV 1820, First Year Seminar, UConn Reads: Persepolis (Spring 2014): A one-credit course connected to the Office of the President’s 2013-2014 UConn Reads initiative. Students analyzed the graphic novel Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi through multiple humanities and social science lenses, prepare mock grant applications in groups, and conduct individualized creative academic reflections on the text to be publicly presented and submitted for consideration in the university-wide UConn Reads student competition. The course supported undergraduate academic engagement and enrichment, highlighting the value of life-long learning.

EDLR 5099 Teaching through Transition Graduate Seminar (Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015): A three-credit course on student transition pedagogy and praxis for Master’s or Education students teaching sections of First Year Experience. Graduate students produced collaborative bi-weekly annotated bibliographies of course literature, personal weekly teaching reflections, regular discussion posts, and a transferable semester projects on students in transition. They also prepared for and reflected upon a teaching observation conducted in their FYE course.

UNIV 1800, University Learning Skills (Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016): A component of the First Year Experience program, this course acquainted first-year students with university and college-level expectations to support their transition to the university. The course centered on a holistic approach to student development focused on critical and creative thinking, college-level writing, and career exploration.

INTD 1810, Humanities House Learning Community Seminar (Fall 2012, Spring 2013): Two-semester series of interdisciplinary one-credit courses in the humanities open only to participants in the Humanities House Learning Community. In these courses students developed critical thinking, writing, research, presentation, and reflection skills through the lens of interdisciplinary humanities scholarship.

POLS 1207, Non-Western Comparative Politics – Online (Summer 2012): Three-credit summer course taught through the University of Connecticut’s online Blackboard LMS introducing students to Comparative Politics topics such as defining West and Non-West, democracy, capitalism, and human rights as well as in-depth case studies of Brazil, India, and Japan.

INTD 1810, Global Education (Spring 2012): One-credit interdisciplinary problem-based learning seminar using online simulated international water resource negotiations among different sections of the course. Note: I co-taught my section as a mentor for a graduate student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Master’s program to help him further develop his skills before teaching independently at the university.

INTD 1810, Leadership Learning Community Seminar (Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012): Two-semester series of interdisciplinary one-credit courses in leadership open only to participants in the Leadership Learning Community. In these courses students developed critical thinking, writing, research, presentation, reflection, and everyday leadership skills for college and beyond.

ENGL 1011, Seminar in Writing through Literature (Spring 2009): Four-credit course in academic writing through literary texts and criticism. Students were introduced to college-level critical engagement and academic discourse. Content included short stories and modern American drama.

ENGL 1010, Seminar in Academic Writing (Fall 2008): Four-credit course in academic writing through interdisciplinary texts. Students were introduced to college-level critical engagement and academic discourse. Content included news articles and modern American drama.

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